Not For Profit/Exempt Organizations Blog
David Miller

David Miller

Partner

David Miller is a partner in the Tax Department. David advises clients on a broad range of domestic and international corporate tax issues. His practice covers the taxation of financial instruments and derivatives, cross-border lending transactions and other financings, international and domestic mergers and acquisitions, multinational corporate groups and partnerships, private equity and hedge funds, bankruptcy and workouts, high-net-worth individuals and families, and public charities and private foundations. He advises companies in virtually all major industries, including banking, finance, private equity, health care, life sciences, real estate, technology, consumer products, entertainment and energy.

David is strongly committed to pro bono service, and has represented more than 300 charities. In 2011, he was named as one of thirteen “Lawyers Who Lead by Example” by the New York Law Journal for his pro bono service. David has also been recognized for his pro bono work by The Legal Aid Society, Legal Services for New York City and New York Lawyers For The Public Interest.

David has been consistently recognized by leading industry publications, such as Chambers Global, Chambers USA, Best Lawyersand The Legal 500. Clients surveyed by Chambers USA said, “We bring him in on complex matters because he has the experience and the gravitas.” David is one of 17 lawyers in the United States in The Legal 500’s Hall of Fame for US Tax (non-contentious).

David teaches tax policy at the New York University School of Law. He previously taught the taxation of financial instruments at Columbia Law School. He is also a frequent author and has written a number of articles and chapters in various tax publications. David is the former chair of the tax section of the New York State Bar Association.

Prior to joining Proskauer, David was a partner at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP.

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Five Excise Tax Tips For Tax-Exempt Employers

As we have previously discussed, the 2017 tax reform act created a new excise tax under section 4960 of the Internal Revenue Code that will affect many tax-exempt employers.  The tax is 21% of certain compensation and can be triggered if an employee receives more than $1 million of compensation or an employee receives certain … Continue Reading

IRS Releases Interim Guidance on New Excise Tax on Executive Compensation Paid by Tax-Exempt Organizations

On December 31, 2018, the Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) and the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) released Notice 2019-09 (the “Notice”), which provides interim guidance under Section 4960 of the Internal Revenue Code. Very generally, Section 4960 imposes a 21% excise tax on certain tax-exempt entities (and certain related organizations) that pay remuneration in … Continue Reading

Updates for Tax-Exempt Organizations from the Senate Bill

Early on December 2, 2017, the Senate passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Senate Bill”).  This blog entry describes certain provisions of the Senate Bill that would have the most significant impact on the nonprofit community, including important differences between the Senate Bill and the prior version of the Senate bill and the … Continue Reading

New Rules for Tax-Exempt Organizations in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

House Republican Tax Bill Imposes Excise Tax on Wealthy Private Universities and Excess Compensation of Highly Paid Employees; Subjects State Pension Plans to UBTI Rules On Thursday, November 2, House Republicans led by Speaker Paul Brady (R-WI) and Chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee Kevin Brady (R-TX), released the first public draft of … Continue Reading

UPDATE: President Trump Signs “Johnson Amendment” Executive Order Limiting Treasury’s Actions Against Religious Organizations Engaged in Political Campaign Activities

Introduction On May 4, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order that directs the executive branch to limit its enforcement of the “Johnson Amendment.” As previously reported, the Johnson Amendment prohibits organizations that are exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code from engaging in political campaign activities.¹ The executive order limits enforcement of the … Continue Reading
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